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Eric Adams Gives Apartment Tour as Questions Arise About Where He Lives


“We are still endorsing Yang, and we still believe he is a good guy and a nice guy,” said Rabbi Indig. “But he is new. We always want to make new friends, but we don’t want to throw our old friends under the bus.”

On the other side of the ideological spectrum in the race, more than 40 workers were terminated on Wednesday from the campaign of Dianne Morales, a former nonprofit executive, according to a tweet from a union representing staff members for the campaign. Ms. Morales was once a favorite of the left-wing grass-roots, but her campaign has struggled with significant inner turmoil in recent weeks.

Ms. Morales’s struggles may benefit Ms. Wiley as she seeks to emerge as the party’s left-wing standard-bearer. The well-funded Mr. Stringer had competed for that position as well, and he was, barely, ahead of Ms. Wiley in the NY1 poll.

But last Friday, The New York Times reported on a second woman to accuse him of making unwanted sexual advances decades ago. Mr. Stringer said he had no recollection of the woman, Teresa Logan, but he said that if he had made her uncomfortable, he was sorry. He has denied an earlier accusation of making unwanted advances during a 2001 campaign.

In recent weeks, both Ms. Wiley and Mr. Adams have pulled in a number of prominent endorsers who had previously backed Mr. Stringer.

Mr. Williams, who had not previously endorsed any of the candidates, said that as the city’s public advocate, he had considered staying out of the race. But he said he was “disturbed and dismayed” by what he cast as unsubstantive and even fear-mongering rhetoric in the race, and urged New Yorkers to embrace Ms. Wiley’s candidacy. In doing so, he referenced two past police commissioners, Bernard B. Kerik and Raymond W. Kelly, who he suggested ran the department in ways that harmed nonwhite New Yorkers.

“This moment is being dominated by a loud discussion of whether New York will return to the ‘bad old days,’” he said. “But for so many of us, those ‘bad old days’ run through Bloomberg and Giuliani, through Kerik and Kelly, through the abuses of stop-and-frisk and surveillance, especially in communities of more color.”

Michael Gold, Liam Stack, Michael Rothfeld, Anne Barnard and Jazmine Hughes contributed reporting.





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